“Tumor cell-free DNA copy number instability (CNI) predicts therapeutic response to immunotherapy prior to cycle 2” , was presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (‘ASCO’) Annual Meeting 2016 on 5 June 2016 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois.

The abstract and poster presentation describe the work conducted by independent oncologists in a blinded study to evaluate Chronix Biomedical’s genomic copy number instability score (‘CNI’) and its potential to predict a patient’s response to immunotherapy.

The study was designed to assess CNI performance against RECIST 1.1 and irRECIST, medical standard of care for the assessment of treatment outcomes, and CNI’s effectiveness in predicting treatment outcomes in multiple tumor types undergoing immunotherapy, or combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy treatment.

The study was conducted in 23 patients, one with stage 3 cancer; the rest with stage 4 cancer. Patients were stratified as partial-responders, stable disease or progressive disease to immunotherapy by RECIST1.1. CNI analysis correctly stratified patients with progressive disease and partial-responders in 88% (15 of 17 patients) of cases after the second cycle of immunotherapy treatment and 82% after the first cycle, demonstrating strong concordance. In this study, CNI was used in eight different tumor types (4 advanced melanoma (MEL), 2 renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 5 gastrointestinal, 4 pulmonary, 3 breast, 1 ovarian cancer, 3 pancreatic adenocarcinomas and 1 sarcoma – MEL and RCC received interleukin-2, while the rest received anti-PD-1 with chemotherapy).

brak

brak